Friday, February 13, 2009

Worst Move On The Board VII


T. Chivers - M. Daniels, Internet Blitz 2009.

In the above position our leader and blog founder has just played 37.Kc5-d6. Black's reply was the worst move on the board: what was it?

9 comments:

Grrrr said...

37...Ng6 ??

Jonathan B said...

ooh nasty...

ejh said...

Easy come, easy go

Anonymous said...

Wouldn't 37 f5 - to prepare Kxb4 - have been more accurate? Looks to me like more chess thuggery from Tom.

Angus

Tom Chivers said...

Now now! I think after 37.Kd6, the threat of 38.g5+ forces the humiliating 37... Ng8. Then at the very worst, white can repeat with 38. Kc5 Ne7 and indeed try something else such as 37.f5, so loses nothing by trying 37.Kd6 to see if black plays a worse (or indeed the worst) move.

Anonymous said...

Liar! Tom doesn't play internet blitz anymore. He told us this was the way he planned to improve in an article last year!
Andrew

Tom Chivers said...

Do as I say, not as I do...

an ordinary chessplayer said...

That one wasn't *so* bad, black can console himself that he was dead lost anyway. Much more painful when the superior side does it, like so:

8/5pp1/7p/2KBkn2/8/5PP1/8/8 b - - 50 2
"an ordinary chessplayer" v W.Brown, Boylston Chess Club weekend swiss 1985.04.13. Black to move and then resign.

Vis a vis 37.Kd6, I think it deserves an exclam. The knight will not return from g8. White Bxg8, black king recaptures, *then* K-c5xb4 wins. For example, 37...Ng8 38.h4 h6 39.g5+ Kg6 40.Bg4 f6 41.Be6.

Tom Chivers said...

1...f6?? Oh dear! That's a good one, worthy of the series.

Thanks for your analysis of 37.Kd6. I'd not see that idea. I think an ! might be a bit much, but it's certainly the best move in the position.