Friday, December 02, 2011

If you want prose, read Shakespeare

Question Which of Shakespeare's prose works does Bruce Pandolfini recommend we read?

[The Q & A Way, Chess Café, 23 November 2011]

8 comments:

Jonathan B said...

Meanwhile, in other news ....

iplayoochess said...

There's no other game so esteemed, so venerable that may offer you such an enjoyment away from the board as well. Chess has always been popular with arts, music, movies, literature (how about Carroll's "Through the Looking Glass", Nabokov's "The Defense", Rowling's "The Sorcerer's Stone", Zweig's "The Royal Game, or Bulgakov's "Master and Margarita", an excerpt where Satan and his monstrous cat Behemoth are playing a game may be read here http://wp.me/p1BAmu-IC). All these links to other arts speak of a unique charm the game possesses. In the realm of games it stands alone in dignity...

Mike G said...

Either Macbeth or Julius Caesar?

ejh said...

Both plays as far as I recall, and I've actually read them both. (Both at school, indeed.)

Ilkley Chess said...

Shakespeare did use prose along with poetry in his plays, viz

http://www.theatredatabase.com/16th_century/william_shakespeare_013.html

The difference between poetry and prose is a fine one, Brendan Behan defined it thus,

There was a young fella called Rollocks, Who worked for Ferrier Pollocks, He walked on the strand, With his girl be the hand, And the tide came up to his…. knees

Now that’s prose. If the tide had come any higher, that would’ve been poetry.

ejh said...

The distinction here isn't between prose and poetry: it's between prose and drama. Hence the reference to "prose works".

Mike G said...

Ooops. I didn't realise he wrote anything except the sonnets (Let me compare thee to a summer's day etc) and the plays. Bearing in mind he covered most topics it's perhaps surprising there isn't "be a gayme of chesse out there" in one of his works.

ejh said...

Try this