Tuesday, December 27, 2011

The twelve puzzles of Xmas



White to play and mate in two

Wynne, 1903

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I believe I have cracked not only this one but also this year's theme. I guess we won't be seeing post-Great War compositions any time soon.

ejh said...

Indeed.

But what is the solution?

Martin S. said...

What is the solution?

I confess that, after several tries, & being short on patience, I had to look it up. Pathetic.

It won a prize, & well deserved in my humble opinion.

Jack Rudd said...

1...Qxe6 is a fairly major Unprovided Defence, and after some thought, I decided it was best met with 2.Qf1. This led to 1.Bc6! as the solution, with the following lines:

1...Nxe6 2.Qe4#
1...N elsewhere 2.Be4# (this line is why 1.Ba8? and 1.Bb7? fail: 1...Nb7!)
1...e4 2.Qd5# (and this is why 1.Bd5? fails)
1...Qxe6 2.Qf1#
1...Qf6 2.Nd6#
1...Qg6 2.Rf2#
1...Qg5/f8/h7/h8 2.Rg5#
1...Q elsewhere 2.N6g7#
1...h4 2.Qg4#

ejh said...

It is so.

First published in the Birmingham News. I found it in Barnes, Pick Of The Best Chess Problems, Elliott Right Way, 1976, p. 48.

(Appropriate that Jack should get the answer since I bought the book, secondhand, while on holiday in Devon. Not sure where I got it - Ilfracombe? Barnstaple?)